Year in Review: Highlights of 2021

Even though 2021 was the second year impacted by the COVID 19 pandemic, we feel blessed to still have had many amazing adventures. We spent most of the winter in Connecticut exploring many local spots; the summer road tripping across Utah, Colorado, South Dakota, and Wisconsin (did we mention the number 4300 miles?!?!); and the spring and fall revisiting some of our tried and true favorite spots for new activities. This post is always one of our favorites each year, as it’s fun to go back down “memory lane” and reflect on the best parts of each adventure. So here is a recap of our (documented, publicly shared) 2021 adventures:

10 Ways to Have Fun in Lake Placid in New York

The Adirondacks are credited with the concept of a vacation: since the mid 1800s, New Yorkers have been “vacating” the heat of the city and heading north to the cooler temperatures and natural beauty of the mountains, staying in homes known as “Camps.” The area known as the Adirondack Park is the largest state park in America, as well as the first state park. It covers over six million acres, more than 3,000 ponds and lakes, and over 1,500 miles of hiking trails. Today, more than seven million people visit the Adirondacks each year, but with so much space, so many activities and places to explore, it never feels crowded.

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10 Ways to Have Fun at The Wild Center in New York

Located in Tupper Lake in northern New York, The Wild Center is part natural history museum, part aquarium, part series of nature trails, part massive outdoor playground, and 100% FUN! We first read about The Wild Center when Wild Walk opened in 2015 and it has been on our bucket list until last week! During our visit to the Lake Placid area (The Wild Center is about 30 miles west), we enjoyed a busy morning on campus and wished we could have stayed all day!

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30 Ways to Explore the Adirondack Experience in the Adirondacks, NY

We just returned from a wonderful weekend in Lake Placid and we are so excited to share some of our adventures. Up first was a highlight of the trip: our visit to the Adirondack Experience, the Museum on Blue Mountain Lake in Blue Mountain Lake, New York. Located about 60 miles south of Lake Placid, the Adirondack Experience includes indoor and outdoor exhibits, hiking trails, and tons of interactive workshops and activities and is worthy of a day long visit.

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Museum of Illusions and Little Island in New York City

This weekend, we FINALLY made it back into New York City for the first time in 16 months! We’re lucky enough to be able to drive 65 minutes and end up in the heart of Manhattan, or, in this case, the Chelsea/ Meat Packing District west side of the island. We’ve been hearing a lot of buzz about some outdoor experiences, including Little Island which just opened last month, and wanted to check them out. When we saw that the Museum of Illusions was less than a half mile walk from Little Island, we had our morning set.

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10 Galleries Kids Will Love at the Cloisters in New York City

The term “cloister” refers to an open courtyard, usually found in the center of a religious monastery or convent. Located in Fort Tryon Park in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan, the Met Cloisters are an extension of the Metropolitan Museum of Art that showcases European medieval art and architecture. There are a dozen distinct areas that include 20 galleries and gardens spread throughout the four acre space. The museum was built by architect Charles Collens and opened in 1938. Many of the artifacts and structures, which date back to the 12th through 15th centuries, were saved from various churches, monasteries, and abbeys throughout Europe and recreated throughout the museum complex. There are several stone and wood sculptures, panel paintings and tapestries on display throughout galleries that are meant to recreate the feeling of being in a medieval European monastery. The four cloisters were originally created in France, bought by art dealer and sculpture George Barnard in the early 1900s, and later bought by John D. Rockefeller and donated to the museum.

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